Self Esteem—Down to High

June 4, 2015

Research has shown key differences between individuals with high and low self-esteem. For example, people with high self-esteem focus on growth and improvement, whereas people with low self-esteem focus on not making mistakes in life. People with low self-esteem are more troubled by failure and tend to exaggerate events as being negative. For example, they often interpret non critical comments as critical. They are more likely to experience social anxiety and low levels of interpersonal confidence. This in turn makes social interaction with others difficult as they feel awkward, shy, conspicuous, and unable to adequately express themselves when interacting with others. Furthermore, low self-esteem individuals tend to be pessimistic towards people and groups within society.

Characteristics that best describe students with low self-esteem: http://www.simplypsychology.org/self-concept.html

  1. Insecure
  2. Underachieving
  3. Negative (attitude)
  4. Unhappy
  5. Socially inept
  6. Angry/hostile
  7. Unmotivated
  8. Depressed
  9. Dependent/follower
  10. Poor self-image
  11. Non-risk-taker
  12. Lacks elf-confidence
  13. Poor communication

Mark Tyrrel l, co-author of the The Giant Within – Maximise Your Self Esteem, also states the following characteristics of genuinely low self esteem:

  1. Social withdrawal
  2. Anxiety and emotional turmoil
  3. Lack of social skills and self confidence. Depression and/or bouts of sadness
  4. Less social conformity
  5. Eating disorders
  6. Inability to accept compliments
  7. An Inability to see yourself ‘squarely’ – to be fair to yourself
  8. Accentuating the negative
  9. Exaggerated concern over what you imagine other people think
  10. Self neglect
  11. Treating yourself badly but NOT other people
  12. Worrying whether you have treated others badly
  13. Reluctance to take on challenges
  14. Reluctance to put yourself first or anywhere.
  15. Reluctance to trust your own opinion
  16. Expecting little out of life for yourself.

How can people Improve Self esteem?

Self-esteem is made up of the thoughts, feelings, and opinions we have about ourselves. That means self-esteem isn’t fixed. It can change, depending on the way we think. Over time, habits of negative thinking about ourselves can lower self-esteem.

Sometimes, people don’t even realize that they’re thinking so negatively about themselves. But once you’re aware of it, and know that the way you think is up to you, you can begin to change the way you think. And changing the way you think about yourself changes the way you feel about yourself.

Manage your inner critic. Notice the critical things you say to yourself. Would you talk to a best friend like that? A harsh inner voice just tears us down. If you’re in the habit of thinking self-critically, re-train yourself by rewording these negative unkind thoughts into more helpful feedback.

Focus on what goes well for you. Are you so used to focusing on your problems that they’re all you see? Next time you catch yourself dwelling on problems or complaints about yourself or your day, find something positive to counter it. Each day, write down three good things about yourself, and/or three things that went well that day because of your action or effort.

Aim for effort rather than perfection. Some people get held back by their own pressure to be perfect. They lose out because they don’t try. If you think, “I won’t audition for the play because I probably won’t get the lead,” it’s guaranteed that role will go to someone else.

View mistakes as learning opportunities. Accept that you will make mistakes. Everyone does. They’re part of learning. Instead of thinking, “I always mess up” remind yourself that it’s not about always, just this specific situation. What can you do differently next time?

Edit thoughts that get you feeling inferior. Do you often compare yourself with others and come up feeling less accomplished or less talented? Notice what you’re thinking. Something like: “She’s so much better than I am. I’m no good at basketball. I should just stop playing” leads to feeling inferior, not to feeling good about yourself.

Remind yourself that everyone excels at different things.Focus on what you do well, and cheer on others for their success. Thinking more like this: “She’s a great basketball player — but the truth is, I’m a better musician than athlete. Still, I’ll keep playing because I enjoy it.” helps you accept yourself and make the best of the situation.

Try new things, and give yourself credit. Experiment with different activities to help you get in touch with your talents. Then take pride in your new skills. Think about the good results. For example: I signed up for track and found out I’m pretty fast! These positive thoughts become good opinions of yourself, and add up to self-esteem.

Recognize what you can change and what you can’t. If you realize that you’re unhappy with something about yourself that you can change (like getting to a healthy weight), start today. If it’s something you can’t change (like your height), work on accepting it. Obsessing about our “flaws” can really skew your opinion of yourself and bring down your self-esteem. Most of the time, other people don’t even notice these things!

Set goals. Think about what you’d like to accomplish. Then make a plan for how to do it. Stick with your plan, and keep track of your progress. Train your inner voice to remind you of what you are accomplishing. For example: “I’ve been following my plan to exercise every day for 45 minutes. I feel good that I’ve kept my promise to myself. I know I can keep it up.”

Take pride in your opinions and ideas. Don’t be afraid to voice them. If someone disagrees, it’s not a reflection on your worth or your intelligence. That person just sees things differently from you.

Accept compliments. When self-esteem is low, it’s easy to overlook the good things people say about us. We don’t believe it when someone says a nice thing. Instead, we think, “…yeah, but I’m not all that great…” and we brush off the compliment. Instead, let yourself absorb a compliment, appreciate it, and take it seriously. Give sincere compliments, too.

Make a contribution. Tutor a classmate who’s having trouble, help clean up your neighborhood, participate in a walkathon for a good cause, or volunteer your time in some other way. When you can see that what you do makes a difference, it builds your positive opinion of yourself, and makes you feel good. That’s self-esteem.

Exercise! Being active and fit helps you feel good about yourself. You’ll relieve stress, and be healthier, too!

Relax and have fun. Do you ever think stuff like “I’d have more friends if I were more attractive”? Thoughts like these can set you on a path to low self-esteem because they focus on what’s not perfect instead of making the best of what is. Spend time with the people you care about, do the things you love, and focus on what’s good. That helps you feel good about yourself, just as you are.

Reviewed by: D’Arcy Lyness, PhD

http://teenshealth.org/teen/your_mind/

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